Archive for June, 2010

Reputation Management and Social Media Pew Research Overview

REPUTATION MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL MEDIA OVERVIEW

More than half (57%) of adult internet users say they have used a search engine to look up their name and see what information was available about them online, up from 47% who did so in 2006. Young adults, far from being indifferent about their digital footprints, are the most active online reputation managers in several dimensions. For example, more than two-thirds (71%) of social networking users ages 18-29 have changed the privacy settings on their profile to limit what they share with others online. 

Reputation management has now become a defining feature of online life for many internet users, especially the young. While some internet users are careful to project themselves online in a way that suits specific audiences, other internet users embrace an open approach to sharing information about themselves and do not take steps to restrict what they share. 

“Search engines and social media sites now play a central role in building one’s identity online,” said Mary Madden, Senior Research Specialist and lead author of the report, “Many users are learning and refining their approach as they go–changing privacy settings on profiles, customizing who can see certain updates and deleting unwanted information about them that appears online.” 

When compared with older users, young adults are more likely to restrict what they share and whom they share it with. “Contrary to the popular perception that younger users embrace a laissez-faire attitude about their online reputations, young adults are often more vigilant than older adults when it comes to managing their online identities,” said Madden. 

[Sent from Ralph Paglia’s iPhone]

Ralph Paglia
Director – Digital Marketing
ADP Dealer Services
cell: 505-301-6369 

RPaglia@Gmail.com 

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Hoss Devine: Where Have All The Leaders Gone?

When was the last time you worked with a manager and said, “that person is a great leader”?

Early in my career, I can honestly say I learned more about what kind of leader I didn’t want to be rather than the kind Ido want to be. Unfortunately, I found myself learning and practicing management traits of those poor leaders.

It wasn’t until someone cared about me enough to tell me “you’re a prick to people at times” that I realized I needed to do something about it.

Needless to say, it wasn’t the first time in my life I had heard that statement, but I had never heard it from someone I respected. This gentleman modeled what it means to be a truly great leader, and I respected him because of his leadership. We don’t agree on everything, but we do agree on core leadership principles.

Over the years, I have consulted many stores and have to say that I have yet to see great leadership initially.

I remember a line in the movie “Remember the Titans”: “Attitude reflects leadership.” If your business isn’t doing what you think it should, then you should probably look in the mirror. The speed of the team is the speed of the coach.

When you look at any great team or business, leadership is the key to their success. We all have heard “it’s all about people” and that saying will ring true forever.

You can beat yourself up and make excuses for your people by saying, “they learned it from me; it’s not their fault.” But now it’s time to get over it and do something about it. I hear people say they need better people, processes, inventory, traffic, advertising strategies, etc. and it might be true. 

You may need all of those things, but without great leadership none of those things will create a business model with any longevity.

Now that we’ve talked about some of the problems we have, let’s talk about some solutions. Don’t hire or promote people to do a job unless you are committed to training them how to do that job. 

It is criminal to put someone in a position to fail. Why do we have one of the highest turnover rates of any business in the country? 

Do you really think its because all of those people are
unqualified or incapable of doing the job? 

No! It’s because we don’t prepare people to be successful. 

Think about it for a minute. 

We hire a salesman because he interviews well, then we sit him in front of a TV watching videos for 2 days on how to sell a car and then 3 days on product knowledge and tests. Then we spend a couple of hours on how to fill out paperwork, turn him loose and then say, “Go out there and get’er done.

Is that really preparing the person to be successful?

The real irony is that if the person we did that to happens to be successful, we promote him to management and say, “Alright – get these guys going and sell some cars!”

In our industry the number of dealerships that actually train their managers to be great managers is very slim. You have a multi-million dollar business, and the only people who have any real training on how to do their job is the office manager (who more than likely has a college degree) and the
service technicians.

But the least trained people in the company are customer-facing employees that you depend on, not only for your business but also your long-term reputation.

We need to wake up!!! We can’t simply rely on the walk-in customers anymore. You have to have skilled salespeople and managers in order to have any type of success today.

Your people have to love what they do, love the game, be proficient at it, and play for keeps. Managers need to learn how to manage people individually.

No longer can you berate people and M-F them in order to get the desired behavior or result. I’m not saying to coddle them or not hold them accountable, but it is possible to hold people accountable without belittling them or browbeating them; you just have to change your approach.

In order to have any success in the new automotive industry, we must be more scientific about how we manage our business, and that should start with our people. People are not thick-skinned like we were growing up in the business.

We have more generations in the work place today than ever before, and each one of those generations has to be managed differently. If you’re not profiling people before you hire them, you can expect to have a lot of turnover and generally unproductive people.

There are tools out there today to help ensure the success of people, tools that teach how to manage people on an individual level so they can be the most productive.

Over the last couple of years I have read a lot of articles about how to increase business and profit, but nobody is talking about the most important thing when it comes to increasing your business and profit: PEOPLE.

If you really want to make a difference in your dealership, begin training your people everyday and in daily one-on-ones.

Take the time and invest in their future. The return on investment will be greater than you ever imagined.

Source: Written by Hoss Devine

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Google Changes SEO Rules – Reduces Impact of Onsite Search Optimization

SEO Implications Of Google’s “Reasonable Surfer” Patent

Written by Eric Enge 

On May 11, 2010, Google was granted a new patent that basically states that all links on a page do not have to carry (or pass) the same weight. The concept is that the value a link should pass to a target page will be largely based on the probability that a user would click on it (hat tip to Bill Slawski who wrote a great post deconstructing Google’s reasonable surfer patent).

Some simple examples of how this might work include:

  • Links to unrelated content are highly unlikely to be clicked
  • Specific types of content, such as “about us” or “privacy” pages, may be more—or less—likely to get clicked, depending on context
  • Location of the link on the page (above the fold should get more weight than below the fold)
  • Emphasis to make links more prominent, such as changing size or color, should add weight

These are just a few examples, and Bill’s post provides a much more comprehensive list. The question is, how does this affect the way that you look at SEO? Here are some thoughts.

Emphasize your most important links. When you create a new page, or modify an existing one, consider which outbound links on the page you want to pass the most value to. On the home page of the site, these might be links to your bestselling products. Perhaps you have a nice list of these in the right column of a three page layout, and it is currently below the fold on the page. Since these are the products which make the most money for you, consider moving the list to the left or middle columns, and figure out how to get it above the fold.

Leverage image links. For my first controversial idea, imagine the impact on image links. Images are far more likely to get clicked on. Does that mean that image links pass more value than text links, even without the anchor text? Probably not as yet, but it is an intriguing idea..

Use embedded links. Links embedded in the main content of the page are more likely to get clicked than those elsewhere on a page. Remember those key product links I mentioned? In addition to emphasizing them for more visibility when a page is initially displayed, consider integrating one or more of them into the content most likely to be seen by a user when they arrive at your web page.

De-emphasize navigation. It may be that basic global navigation links could pass less value for many reasons, including the fact that people tend to develop “snow blindness” with page elements that are frequently repeated. Navigation links also may be considered to have a lower degree of relevance (for example, a link to your automotive products from your lawn and garden products page).

Forget footers. Footer links will certainly be less likely to pass value. Not only do they have the snow blindness problem, they tend to be way below the fold.

Skip the ads. Anything that may be perceived as an ad, whether or not it is an ad, or is labelled as such, would be likely to be devalued.

Link only to relevant content. While this is not covered by the patent as far as I can see, I’d be willing to conjecture that a page linking to non-relevant documents could be seen as less relevant itself to the original content of the source page. Taken to its extreme, this could mean lower rankings could result from linking to pages that are low in relevance, even if they are not necessarily “bad” pages.”

Reconsider purchased links. Devaluing links to non-relevant content would provide further discouragement for authoritative or trusted sites from selling links. Link buyers will likely see less value from those links on the right rail, or in the footer, and will press harder for in-context, in-content links. Higher quality sites are generally not willing to provide such links.

As a practical matter, processing CSS to understand the details of page layout is a challenging task for Google, or any search engine. Patrick Altoft of Blogstorm argues that Google may use click data from Google Analytics, the Google Toolbar, Google Reader and other sources to evaluate link value.

My own opinion is that Google is surely going to find as many signals as they can to help them understand the importance of a page’s outbound links. If they are using click data as Patrick argues, the users themselves will identify which links are the most important ones. The only underlying requirement is that the page has enough traffic for the click pattern data to be statistically significant. But, of course, pages with material traffic tend to be the most important pages on the web.

The concept of how a reasonable surfer would behave appears to have a lot of merit, and the search engines are investing everything they can in better ranking systems, and ones that reduce the impact of spam. But ultimately, basic usability guidelines still apply. Understanding how a user sees your site and their behavior when they interact with it has always made sense. Now consider the idea that this can influence the ranking of a given page, but also the value of the links it provides to other web page.

Written by Eric Enge 

<Sent from Ralph Paglia’s iPad>


Ralph Paglia
Cell: 505-301-6369

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Groupon Social Marketing Best Practice: 73% Off at Courtesy Chevrolet

Groupon Web and Email Campaign: 73% Off at Courtesy Chevrolet

This is the type of promo that the ADP Social Media Reputation Management team sets up with our dealers. This is a really smokin’ deal! — Jessica Fielding 

Your Daily
Phoenix
Groupon  |  
View this email in a browser
  | 

 Add
mail@e.groupon.com
to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox! 


The Daily Deal for

Phoenix

Saturday, June 12 2010       

follow us:

 

$65 for a Full Auto Detail at Courtesy Chevrolet ($243.95 Value)

$65

worth:

discount:

savings:

$244

73%

$179

Company Information:
Courtesy Chevrolet
website
Locations:
1233 E Camelback Rd.

Phoenix, Arizona 85014

Cars often get dirty, and when they do, the most common solution is to reprimand them with bats and buy a new one. Avoid crushing your car’s body and feelings with today’s Groupon: for $65, you get a full auto detail (a $243.95 value) at Courtesy Chevrolet on Camelback Road. This Groupon is good for all makes and models (extra fee for large vehicles), and also includes 15% off any other service (excluding maintenance).

Since 1955, Courtesy Chevrolet has been building its reputation as a quality, family-owned auto dealership that exceeds customer expectations. With today’s deal, trust your car to Courtesy’s friendly professionals for a full exterior and interior detail regardless of the car’s make, model, or political affiliation. Each horseless carriage will receive the following:

  • Goodwrench vehicle-safety inspection
  • Interior shampoo
  • Interior vinyl cleaning and dressing
  • Interior and trunk vacuuming
  • Leather cleaning and conditioning
  • Moderate bug and tar removal
  • Door-jamb cleaning
  • Engine-compartment cleaning and dressing
  • Exterior polish
  • Hand-applied wax
  • Tire and trim dressing
  • Tire, rim, and wheel-well cleaning
  • Window, mirror, and ashtray cleaning

For an extra $25, customers may add fabric protector and paint sealant, which protects the finish against sun and weather, bird droppings, tree sap, and stray splashes from whale blowholes. Before your grandfather’s Model A Ford collapses under a pile of pixie dust in the barn, tow it in for a much-needed detail from the courteous, curtseying pros at Courtesy Chevrolet.

The detail and safety inspection can take four to six hours, so call ahead to make an appointment.

Read More…

When did the Devil get so needy?

Need help? Have feedback? Feel free to
Contact Us

This email is an excellent example of a car dealership leveraging a Social Media channel for Marketing purposes.  Over 100,000 consumers in Phoenix received thia promotional offer from Courtesy Chevrolet because they signed up for the Daily Groupon alerts.

Delivered by
Groupon
600 W. Chicago Avenue, Suite 620 Chicago, IL, 60654, USA

To purchase the Groupon voucher described in today’s deal, you must press the Buy! Button and follow the instructions. Once you make the purchase, you will receive the voucher via e-mail. This e-mail is not a valid Groupon voucher, even if you buy today’s deal – the only valid voucher is the voucher you receive via e-mail from Groupon after your purchase.

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Best Car Dealer: 73% Off at Courtesy Chevrolet

Congratulations and Kudos to the Courtesy Chevrolet Team in Phoenix! You made top billing on Groupon and letting hundreds of thousand of people in the Phoenix Valley know Where the Best Deals are… At the Big C, located Right on the Corner of 12th and East Camelback where they are ALWAYS Right on the Price!
Courtesy Chevrolet is the only place I have ever been able to actually buy a new car with only $1,000 down and payments less than $200 a month! And it was a brand new Chevrolet Impala!!!

[Sent from Ralph Paglia’s iPhone]

Ralph Paglia
Director – Digital Marketing
ADP Dealer Services
cell: 505-301-6369 

RPaglia@Gmail.com 

Begin forwarded message:

From: Jessica Fielding <adpjessica@gmail.com>
Date: June 12, 2010 9:03:26 AM 
Subject: 73% Off at Courtesy Chevrolet

This is the type of promo that the best car dealers use to leverage social media marketing… This is a really smokin’ deal from one of the best car dealers in Arizona!

Your Daily
Phoenix
Groupon  |  
View this email in a browser
  | 

Be sure to add
mail@e.groupon.com
to your address book or safe sender list so our emails get to your inbox.
Learn how



The Daily Deal for
Phoenix

Daily deal is at Courtesy Chevrolet!


Saturday, June 12 2010


follow us:
 http://Twitter.com/ADPsocial 

$65 for a Full Auto Detail at Courtesy Chevrolet ($243.95 Value)

$65

worth:

discount:

savings:

$244

73%

$179

Company Information:
Courtesy Chevrolet
website
Locations:
1233 E Camelback Rd.

Phoenix, Arizona 85014

Cars often get dirty, and when they do, the most common solution is to reprimand them with bats and buy a new one. Avoid crushing your car’s body and feelings with today’s Groupon: for $65, you get a full auto detail (a $243.95 value) at Courtesy Chevrolet on Camelback Road. This Groupon is good for all makes and models (extra fee for large vehicles), and also includes 15% off any other service (excluding maintenance).

Since 1955, Courtesy Chevrolet has been building its reputation as a quality, family-owned auto dealership that exceeds customer expectations. With today’s deal, trust your car to Courtesy’s friendly professionals for a full exterior and interior detail regardless of the car’s make, model, or political affiliation. Each horseless carriage will receive the following:

  • Goodwrench vehicle-safety inspection
  • Interior shampoo
  • Interior vinyl cleaning and dressing
  • Interior and trunk vacuuming
  • Leather cleaning and conditioning
  • Moderate bug and tar removal
  • Door-jamb cleaning
  • Engine-compartment cleaning and dressing
  • Exterior polish
  • Hand-applied wax
  • Tire and trim dressing
  • Tire, rim, and wheel-well cleaning
  • Window, mirror, and ashtray cleaning

For an extra $25, customers may add fabric protector and paint sealant, which protects the finish against sun and weather, bird droppings, tree sap, and stray splashes from whale blowholes. Before your grandfather’s Model A Ford collapses under a pile of pixie dust in the barn, tow it in for a much-needed detail from the courteous, curtseying pros at Courtesy Chevrolet.

The detail and safety inspection can take four to six hours, so call ahead to make an appointment.

Read More…


Need help? Have feedback? Feel free to
Contact Us

Delivered by
Groupon
600 W. Chicago Avenue, Suite 620 Chicago, IL, 60654, USA

To purchase the Groupon voucher described in today’s deal, you must press the Buy! Button and follow the instructions. Once you make the purchase, you will receive the voucher via e-mail. This e-mail is not a valid Groupon voucher, even if you buy today’s deal – the only valid voucher is the voucher you receive via e-mail from Groupon after your purchase.

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Hollman Auto Group Considering Social Media Marketing

Hollman Auto Group Reportedly Considering Automotive Social Media Marketing for Hollman Ford and Hollman Lincoln Mercury – Facebook Promotions for Their New Jersey Ford and Lincoln Mercury Dealerships!

The Hollman Auto Group may be considering either hiring a professional or an internally executed approach to Social Media Marketing (SMM) and its closely related cousin "Repuation Management" for their Ford and Lincoln Mercury dealership’s in the Cherry Hill, New Jersey area, not far from Philadelphia. 
Hollman Auto Group would do well to remember emphasizing the “social” in their content creation and messaging strategy more so than the “marketing.” 
Why? Because Ford and Lincoln Mercury buyers in the Southern New Jersy and Philadelphia areas where Hollman Auto Group operates are the type of social media users that seek out and are more likely to respond to genuine communication, not marketing spin from the Hollman Auto Group’s Ad Agency. Nowhere is that more apparent than the most widely used Philadelphia and New Jersey sections of social networking sites like Facebook. 
To make the most out of their efforts to market with social media, the Hollman Auto Group would do well to get some advice from an Automotive Social Media Marketing firm, such as ADP Dealer Services new ADP Social Media Reputation Management team based at the SkySong Operations Center in Scottsdale, Arizona.  Alternately, the Hollman Auto Group could hire ADP Social Marketing Consultants to work with Hollman Auto Group employees assigned tobbe the group’s voice on the Social Web or, at the very least, read a few tips on how to use social media at the following recommended sites:  http://www.SocialDealer.BZ and http://www.ADPsocial.com
  





Facebook demographics have shifted. Once thought of as an online hangout for high school kids and university students, it is now increasingly the networking site of choice for older groups.

In January, 2009, O’Reilly released its 2009 Facebook Demographics and Statistics report. The fastest growing demographic on Facebook is users aged 35 to 54. The growth in this demographic is off the charts – 276% in the last 6 months of 2008.

Users aged 55 and over are also discovering Facebook. This demographic jumped by 194% in the same time period. The younger crowd is still there though. The number of 25 to 34-year-olds using Facebook doubles about every six months.

Clearly, there are abundant marketing opportunities here for The Hollman Auto Group… But managers at the Hollman Auto Group need to know how to approach their Philadelphia area and Southern New Jersey audience right.  Effective Automotive Social Media Marketing is All About the Soft Sell

To get the Hollman Auto Group started in marketing on Facebook, their ADP Social Marketer (SoMar) will create a page for the Hollman Ford and the Hollman Lincoln Mercury dealership’s in New Jersey. Once Hollman Ford and Hollman Lincoln Mercury have established these Hollman Facebook pages, each dealership can build a list of fans.  Fans can follow Hollman Auto Group dealerships and receive updates whenever a Hollman Auto Group dealership adds something to your page. The key is to add information of value so people in the Philadelphia and Cherry Hill, NJ markets don’t feel they’re being given a hard sell.

ADP Social Marketers will use Facebook notes to tell people about upcoming Hollman Auto Group sponsored car shows or special "Hollman Auto Group Fans Only" events that they will be invited to.

Hollman Auto Group will be able to use the Facebook mini-feed to keep people connected to their Hollman Automotive Community Social Network.  Hollman Auto Group employees can talk about new and exciting model launches from Ford and Lincoln Mercury.  Hollman Auto Group can keep people interested in new and used cars at their dealerships, without sounding like they are guilty of selling in a social setting.

If the Hollman Auto Group can keep it interesting with photos and video clips, not only will they promote their Hollman Ford and Hollman Lincoln Mercury dealership’s, they will give their well established family owned dealership’s an updated and warm personality. The key is for the Hollman Auto Group to allow visitors to see the people behind the company name.

Hollman dealerships can create Facebook groups by make and model  if Hollman Auto Group really wants to personalize their contact with users. People join groups with specific interests, and moderating a group can help Hollman Auto Group managers reach a specific audience. Keep in mind that the group is an entity unto itself, and not a page about Hollman Auto Group, so it needs to be handled accordingly. Messages sent to the group are delivered directly to member’s Inboxes, so ensure that what you are sharing is of real value to people.

Keeping Up with Social Media Marketing
Herein lies the real challenge with social media marketing – upkeep. Hollman Auto Group must not let their Hollman Ford and Hollman Lincoln Mercury Facebook pages get stale. But between writing Hollman Auto Group blog posts, moderating a group, managing RSS feeds and just keeping up with the communication that ADP Social Media Marketing will generate, social media marketing could become very labor-intensive for the Hollman Auto Group!

If the Hollman Auto Group needs help planning or managing their social media marketing strategy, ADP offers training courses, online webinars and our social marketing consultants can help.  But, for many very successful dealers, the right choice is to let the pros at ADP Social Media Reputation Managenent deliver a turn key solution. 

And remember, you only have one chance to make a good first impression. If you don’t handle your social media marketing right from the beginning, you could end up doing more harm than good. Take the time to learn how to do it right, so you can reap the benefits for a long time to come. 

Related Posts

[Sent from Ralph Paglia’s iPhone]

Ralph Paglia
Director – Digital Marketing
ADP Dealer Services
cell: 505-301-6369 

RPaglia@Gmail.com 

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Measuring ROI For Social Media Marketing

SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING ROI MEASUREMENT
WRITTEN BY AMBER NASLUND

1. If you aren’t measuring anything else, social media measurement isn’t the problem.

Measurement is a discipline, and it needs to be business-wide. If you’re going to ask about the ROI, value, or impact of social media and how to measure it, I’m going to ask how you’re going about determining those things for other areas of your business, and ask you to translate or adapt some of those practices over to social initiatives.

If you’re not measuring anything else, you’ll have a learning curve. A steep one. It’ll come complete with needing the right tools and platforms to collect data, the right people to analyze it, the buy in from management to spend the time doing all of this, and the commitment to use the measurement as a means to underscore your strategy. The social media data is available for the taking, so that’s not the problem. The *real* issue is connecting the dots. See #4.

2. Measurement is not the goal.

The goal is to derive insights that teach you something of value, and then act on them. Measurement is a waystation, a path, but is not the goal in itself. You don’t get a cookie for measuring.

You probably need to spend three times as much time and effort evaluating and acting on your data than you do collecting and formatting it. Why? Because the analysis is what yields direction, plans, action steps, you name it. You START with the data. You need to end up with a course of action, or the act of measuring (and all the time you spent doing it) is wasted.

3. Measuring activity isn’t as important as measuring results.

Gathering fans on Facebook is an activity. How those fans chose to respond to your offer, sign up for your newsletter, or buy your product (or not) is a result.

Number of forum posts is an activity. How many of those forum posts converted new downloads of your latest ebook is a result. (Even better if you can take it a step further and show the ebook downloads that became leads).

Follow me? We’re very caught up in trying to track all the stuff we’re doing, and not spending enough time connecting dots between those actions and how they drive progress toward the goals we’ve set. Speaking of which…

4. Metrics are determined by goals.

Learn how to create measurable objectives and the metrics practically jump out at you. If you know where you’re headed and have a clear definition of what it means to reach your goal, it becomes pretty apparent which signals (metrics) will tell you whether you’re close, far, or right on target.

And you don’t need 40 different metrics to underscore a hypothesis or progress toward a goal. Typically you just need a few. If your goal is to raise awareness for a cause, you can look at reach of mentions and messages, increased donations, or a surge in volunteer signups. Those go up, you can be reasonably certain that what you’re doing is contributing to those things, and likely justify staying the course. Which leads me to a biggie…

5. Cause and Correlation are different.

Cause means that something you did drove someone to act. Directly, and usually singly. There’s a clear line between initiative and result. (We could argue that nearly every causal relationship has external influences, but that discussion for a headier day).

Correlation is fuzzier, and where most folks get hung up with measurement. It’s about a relationship between two things, usually an action and a result, but that relationship isn’t exclusive of other factors.

We struggle with these two, because we’re often trying to prove cause, when correlation can be just as valuable in terms of justifying our efforts. Think of correlation as “contributing to” or “influencing”. So if you do an outreach campaign in social media and lead numbers through those channels increase, you can say that those two events are likely strongly correlated. (By contrast, if you do a campaign in social media and your offline event attendance increases, they might still be related, but likely more loosely).

Remember that today, we have any number of points where prospects and customers can be impacted by what we do. Proving cause can be tricky, because you can’t trace every interaction someone has with your company.

But we strive for cause why? Because we want CREDIT. We want to be able to say that OUR effort is what moved the needle so we can justify time, budget, headcount. But the only way to truly prove cause to a major degree is to adjust ONLY one thing while leaving all other factors the same. We rarely if ever do that in business, because we’re not conducting science experiments. We’re simply trying to understand what helps and what hinders. Get comfortable with this phrase: reasonable degree of confidence.

6. Analysis is the hard part, not measurement.

The human brain factor is the complicated bit. Data is easy to collect, easy to smash together, easy to do math around. The REAL question is: what does all this MEAN to me and why? What does this tell me about the effect and impact of my actions?

That’s the hard part because no tool in the world can do that for you. No case study will show you precisely the map you need to follow for YOUR business (though it might spark some ideas). No one person can hand you a turn-key set of metrics that will suddenly give you a lightbulb moment and show you the path ahead of you. Put the effort into goal setting on the front end and analysis on the back end, and let measurement be a process in between.

7. Standardization has limitations.

You might have some *types* of metrics that can be bucketed together – such as engagement or awareness metrics – but the unique ones that matter to your business aren’t likely to be standardized anytime soon. That’s a departure from the way we’ve always done it, but then again, some of our “standard” metrics haven’t really gotten us very far (like ad equivalency) and others are standard in name, but not in how they’re calculated (like customer satisfaction).

Instead of striving for metrics that are universally applicable, focus instead on the ones that consistently deliver valuable intelligence for your business. It doesn’t matter what the guy down the street is measuring unless you’re just looking for a little inspiration.

8. Reporting is not an outcome.

Related to #2, delivering the graph isn’t the end of the road. It’s what you outline as the next steps to either a) keep doing what you’re doing or b) adjust something in order to try and change the results.

The report, in fact, is often the starting line. And reports full of data alone aren’t very useful. The art in reporting isn’t just packaging the information, but its in interpreting and translating that. When you give your boss the monthly report of PR impressions or lead volume, do they ever ask you what you attribute those numbers to, and what recommendations you would make based on that information? Have YOU ever thought about that? Why?

9. Measurement doesn’t have to be complex to be effective.

You don’t necessarily need convoluted indices to get you where you’re headed, especially when you’re starting. Sometimes, just a simple correlation between an awareness metric and a sales timeline can tell you whether there might be a positive relationship, and you can act on that. Think of it this way: pair one qualitative metric – like customer satisfaction – with one related quantitative one, like sales or call center costs or website hits. One metric alone rarely tells you anything valuable.

Are they both headed in the direction you want them to be? Over time, do you see them moving together, away from each other, or in unrelated ways? Do the strategies you have in place to move them both tie into one another?

CAN measurement be complex? Sure. Some really detailed measurement formulas can help you get super scientific and granular. But again, if you’re getting mired in the process of measurement instead of the practice of deriving some intelligence from what you measure, you’re doing it wrong. The average business simply needs a guide, not a dissertation.

10. Measurement is a constant evolution.

You set a goal. You back out a few metrics. Then you evaluate, and realize you haven’t learned anything of value, or that you need more clarity, more specifics, a broader view, or whatever. That’s okay. Look, business is an iterative process. It’s part art, part science, and so is measurement. Who wrote the rule that said we had to have the perfect, bulletproof set of metrics before we start measuring?

If something doesn’t get you the information you need, change what you’re doing and try something else. If you’re missing something, add it. Eventually, you’ll settle into a few combinations of metrics that really illustrate to you those Almighty Actionable Insights.

We’re way too caught up with being perfectionists about gathering and presenting information, and not nearly good enough with FRAMING the information in a way that gives us something to chew on.

11. Measurement is cultural as well as operational.

We’re taught to fear failure, so if we track and measure failure, we don’t want to share it. We manipulate numbers to show our work in its best light, instead of showing the hard truth in order to identify what we need to improve to be more effective. That’s a *culture* problem, based in businesses where accountability is absolute, blame is personal, and failure is a dirty word. That’s a conversation that can’t be fixed with a PPT presentation.

12. Measurement is more than ROI.

Measuring ROI is something we can and should do. Track how much we spend (in time and capital), track how much we net in terms of return (usually $$). That’s a smart move.

But we can’t limit the discussion about measurement to ROI. We have to talk about qualitative metrics, like brand perception, customer satisfaction, advocacy. We have to talk about quantitative metrics that tie to things other than revenue, like reduced costs. We also have to understand the difference between justifying something from a “good use of time” perspective, and looking at a financial return as the way of determining success.

Ultimately, all roads lead to Rome. But so much of social media isn’t about being the sales channel, but is about positively impacting the likelihood of sales through all other experiences.

13. “Social media isn’t measurable” is an excuse.

Here’s what people really mean:

  • I don’t have the right tools in place to collect the data I need
  • When I have all the data, I don’t know where to start
  • I don’t know what data might relate to each other to analyze it well
  • I don’t want to or am not empowered to spend time doing data collection and analysis as part of my job
  • I’m afraid of what measuring will actually tell me about the effectiveness of my work

The first one is a functional problem. The second and third ones are knowledge based, with no exact “right” answers, and require a bit of practice and applied effort, but they’re solvable too. The last two are cultural, and are probably much more firmly rooted in the people rather than the process. That’s a different discussion.

Above all, we have to stop blaming the medium for hindering the measurement process. It’s not social media’s fault at all. If anything, it’s guilty of providing us too much information.

What we need to understand about our own measurement practices is whether we’re equipped with the right tools and data, whether we’re willing to spend the time evaluating that data and extracting the juicy bits, and whether we’re functionally and culturally prepared for what it might show us, for better or for worse.

But make no mistake, folks, basic social media measurement isn’t someone else’s responsibility to sort out for us. And waiting for the manual is simply burning time and money.

Measurement is our job. It’s our responsibility. And it’s within our capabilities, without doubt. So let’s get cracking.

image credit: BigTallGuy


[Sent from Ralph Paglia’s iPhone]

Ralph Paglia
Director – Digital Marketing
ADP Dealer Services
cell: 505-301-6369 

RPaglia@Gmail.com 

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